Low Gluten in Beer

test the gluten content of your beer

Corona Gluten Test

Here is the first test.

Beer: Corona Extra
Producer: Grupo Modelo
Originating country: Mexico
Brewing location: not stated on label, assumption is Mexico as the back label says imported
Bottle size: 0.355 l = 12 Oz.
Alcohol by volume: 4.5%
Ingredients: water, barley malt, corn, rice, hops, papain, ascorbic acid, alginate E405 (translated from German)
Miscellaneous:  Seems to be determined for German and Polish market (back label details in German and Polish).

Corona Gluten Test Corona Gluten Test

Test Kit: Imutest Gluten-in-Food Kit
Preparation: For testing beer the gluten extraction process described in the instructions can be skipped as the gluten in beer is already solubilised. Find some more information here. Beside the test kit and beer sample have a stopwatch handy.

The pictures below describe the test process (from left to right).
1.Preparation
2.Using the diluent liquid
3.Using the visualisation solution

Corona Gluten Test Corona Gluten Test Corona Gluten Test

Test result: There seems to be no gluten in Corona. According to the instructions there should appear a clearly visible pink test spot on the left of the test area ( T ) to indicate the presence of gluten. But there is absolutely nothing to see. The pink spot on the right test area ( C ) is a control spot and indicates that the extract/sample is suitable, the test has been performed correctly and all reagents are active. Even though the detection limit in this kit is very low (1-2 ppm) this test is not a medical advice – please see my facts page.

Corona Gluten Test Corona Gluten Test

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21 Comments

  1. Steffen

    The National Food Agency of Sweden analysed the gluten content of beer including Corona and came to the same result.

    Link to the 2013 research (partly English):
    http://www.slv.se/upload/dokument/rapporter/kemiska/Gluten_i_maltdrycker_SLV-rapport-3_2013.pdf

    Link to a blog with the 2009 research translated to English:
    http://liveatthewitchtrials.blogspot.de/2012/12/gluten-levels-of-73-beers.html

    In both studies gluten could not be detected in Corona Extra

  2. Les Carter from Australia

    Hi, I read the Swedish test, it appears they tested Corona Light? Not heard of that one, we only get the Corona Extra in Australia. Interesting results though.

    When I was on the Golden Princess cruise ship around South America in March, they sold another Mexican beer on board – Dos Equis, I tried one bottle, no problems. Anybody else heard of that one or tried it? Would be interesting to do a Dos Equis test, but not seen that beer in Australia.

    • Steffen

      Hi Les, it only looks like Corona Light but it is only a copy/paste error from the Swedish study. In the study the say:
      Prover från alla tre tillverkningsdatum av Corona Extra 4,6% låg under metodens kvant ifieringsgräns på 10 mg gluten/liter
      Which means something like:
      All three samples of Corona Extra 4,6% with different production dates where below the detectable limit of 10 mg gluten/liter (equal to ppm).
      And further below:
      I prover från denna öl (Corona Extra 4,6 %) påvisades inte gluten.
      =
      In all samples from this beer (Corona Extra 4.6%) were not detectable gluten.

      So it looks good 😉

  3. Les Carter from Australia

    CORONITA, Aldi today had Coronita on special AU$32 for a 24 bottle carton. I purchased two cartons. They are the 210ml bottles. Now ita in Spanish means little, so Coronita = ‘Little Corona,’ right?

    Like several Coeliacs on here, I have had a couple of Coronas in the 355ml bottle now and then, no problems. Now here is what the checkout lady in Aldi at Batemans Bay, News South Wales, Australia, said to me today when I was buying the Coronitas. ‘Oh, we are selling a lot of that fake Corona, the ita means fake’ Whaat ! ‘No way’, I said. ‘Don’t give that incorrect advice out to customers, the Coronitas are the same Corona Beer in a smaller bottle.’ She looked stunned, what made it worse the lady had an Assistant Manager badge on. Anyway, I feel like contacting their Customer Relation Office and putting the staff right on Coronitas.

    So people, just letting you know of these baby Coronas, not sure if they are available in other countries, they are made by Corona in Mexico and imported into Australia. But if you can get them, the smaller size is good for the hot climates and you won’t be consuming as much gluten because of the small bottle, but keep it at 2 or 3 right, like Uncle Les.

    Happy drinking guys. Thanks Steffen.

    • Steffen

      Hi Les, thanks for sharing these information. The Coronitas are not avilable here in Germany but Aldi wouldn’t sell any fake products and the checkout lady seems not to have a clue at all. Hopefully only a single case and exception 😉

      Cheers Steffen

  4. Nick

    Diagnosed Coeliac here, summoned up the courage and one night drank a corona based off these results. no reaction. Next night 2 etc etc. I can easily drink a 6 pack with no dramas!

    • Steffen

      Hi Nick, thanks for your feedback. The personal experience is always the best. But don’t push it over the limits. 😉

      Cheers Steffen

  5. Tito

    Based on the results here I tried Corona Light this weekend. I am a certified diagnosed Celiac and had no reaction to two Coronas Lights on Friday, two on Sat, and two on Sun. I usually have a strong reaction the next morning if I accidentally ingest any gluten. Your results may vary but I was pleasantly surprised by the results.

    On a side note, this debate (beers not having gluten) reminds me of the similar debate a decade ago about liquor. In the early 2000s it was believed that Celiacs couldn’t have whiskey, rum, etc because they too are made with barley, however subsequent testing showed that the triple distillation process removed the gluten, thus us Celiacs can enjoy a Jameson without worry. I think we’re seeing something similar here with certain beers.

    • Steffen

      Hi Tito, thank you very much indeed for your feedback. This is really helpful and confirms what other Celiacs have noticed too. And yes you are right there is lot of paranoia and fear about the gluten in beer. I drink regular beer since I was diagnosed a couple of years ago and have no damage – proven by my Doc.
      It actually is the intention of my site to identify (regular) beers which are suitable for Celiacs and share the results. Thanks again.

      Cheers Steffen

  6. A.C.

    Thx for your research here Steffen. Chanced a Budweiser last nite on the bartender’s advice. So far so good. Only thing was I had forgotten how bad Budweiser was and I actually prefer some of the GF beers (New Grist, Glutenberg, Daura). Still, would like a Corona or a Heineken after 15 years….we will see.

    • Steffen

      Hi A.C. , I have to try New Grist and Glutenberg. Re Daura, well, I would prefer a regular Estrella instead of the Daura – taste is similar but Daura is a bit too pricey and may have as much gluten as the regular Estrella. Cheers Steffen

  7. big in japan

    big in japan

    I tested Corona Extra myself the other day, and it came up negative for gluten for me as well. The results are here:

    http://glutenfreejapan.blogspot.jp/2017/06/corona-extra-appears-to-be-gluten-free.html

  8. Judy Dinkins

    I was just wondering if any of you have tested Coors light. Another celiac friend said it tested less than 5 ppm. I tested it with ez test gluten strips and got a high positive result. Was hoping she was right!

    • big in japan

      big in japan

      Here’s Steffen’s test of Coors Light:

      http://www.lowgluten.org/coors-light-gluten-test/

    • John Dragan

      Hey there Judy, the blog Gluten in Beer tested Coors light and the level of gluten is less then 10ppm, Corona Extra falls in the same category of less then 10ppm. The FDA determined that anything under 20ppm is safe for celiacs like myself. I drink both all the time and have no issues.

      • Steffen

        Hi John, thanks for your feedback. The personal experience is always the best. Corona tests with home test kits were all negative but also the professional tests never showed positive so I am quite convinced that Corona is gf.

        Cheers Steffen

      • big in japan

        big in japan

        Hi John,

        I think it’s important to say that Coors Light and Corona Extra tested less than 10 ppm. These are non-scientific tests done by regular people in their homes. We can’t know for sure how accurate they are, so be careful there.

        Also, as I understand it, the FDA (the US Food and Drug Administration) doesn’t really declare what’s safe for Celiacs. That’s more of a job for you and your doctor. The FDA simply adopted an international guideline that had been set at 20 ppm.

        Also, the concentration isn’t as important as the total amount of gluten ingested. From what I’ve read, at 10mg per day, no intestinal damage occurs. The most sensitive people start reacting about 10mg, while some may not react until 20 or 30mg per day.

        Here’s some more info: https://glutenfreetraveller.com/topics-2/lifestyle/why-is-20ppm-of-gluten-the-safe-level-for-celiacs/

        It’s easy to convert ppm to mg when it comes to beer: 1 liter of 10ppm beer contains 10mg of gluten. 2 liters of 5ppm beer also contain 10mg gluten.

        I hope I did the math right…

        • big in japan

          big in japan

          However, actually ascertaining what is 5ppm beer and what is 10ppm, and so forth, seems to be a very tricky matter.

        • John Dragan

          I drink both with no issues. Anything that is under 20ppm for gluten can be labelled gluten free in the US. The most I ever had in one evening is 4 beers. There is nothing mentioned by the FDA about how much you can consume in one day. I was diagnosed a celiac in 1990 and I know when I have a reaction.

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